Monthly Archives: July 2011

Genome in the Wild

I tested with 23andme in April 2010 and then upgraded to their version 3 chip with almost a million SNPs last Christmas.

Now I am releasing my personal genome in the public domain.

CC0
To the extent possible under law, Zack Ajmal has waived all copyright and related or neighboring rights to Zack Ajmal 23andme v3 Genome. This work is published from: United States.

You can download my genome data in zipped files:

Razib has a list of people who have made their 23andme genomes public.

When Blaine Bettinger released his genome into the public domain, he issued a challenge:

So, I’m challenging everyone who reads this to download my data and analyze it to find the most interesting or surprising results. For example, you could use my most recent 23andMe V3 data.

I’ve already done a fair amount of analysis myself, including the Promethease reports above (and see here), and a recent blog post about my vastly increased Type 2 Diabetes risk. However, perhaps there’s a recent but relatively study that applies, or perhaps there’s a story you can weave with a handful of SNPs. Or, even better, what can you tell me about my ancestry other than mtDNA and Y-DNA haplogroups? Don’t worry about the strength of the study, reproducibility, etc. – I’m aware of the uncertainties associated with this type of research, and my goal here is to make people aware of possibilities.

Please post your findings in the comments below, and in two weeks I’ll pick the most surprising or interesting findings and make them the focus of a new blog post.

Can you surprise me with my own genome?

I have done a fair amount of analysis on my genome. For example, here’s my Promethease report. My ID is DOD128 in Dodecad, PKEG1 in Eurogenes and HRP0001 in Harappa.

My challenge for you would be to find interesting information about my chromosome 9 which is 93% homozygous.

If you analyze my genome, it would be great if you could let me know about what you found as I am always hungry for more information.

Related Reading

Dodecad Oracle

Dodecad has come up with a new version (v3) of its admixture results. Here are my results:

South Asian 37.4%
West Asian 23.3%
Mediterranean 9.8%
West European 9.6%
Southwest Asian 6.2%
East European 3.5%
Southeast Asian 2.4%
East African 2.2%
Northeast Asian 1.9%
Northwest African 1.5%
Neo African 1.1%
Palaeo African 1.0%

Dodecad also has a fun tool to check one’s results against different population averages. My closest populations are:

Population Distance
1 Pathan 7.2021
2 Bene Israel Jews 8.6822
3 Sindhi 10.0479
4 Punjabi Arain 10.0926
5 Kashmiri Pandit 10.5778
6 Burusho 11.179
7 Balochi 11.6705
8 Brahui 13.0208
9 Makrani 15.6735
10 Cochin Jews 18.1403

If I make use of mixed mode, the tool tries to find a combination of two ethnic groups with differing percentages that fits my results best.

Two Population Mix Distance
1 17.3% Palestinian + 82.7% Sindhi 3.0122
2 17% Morocco Jews + 83% Sindhi 3.1181
3 17.3% Palestinian + 82.7% Punjabi Arain 3.1228
4 17.2% Egypt + 82.8% Punjabi Arain 3.1846
5 82.9% Sindhi + 17.1% Egypt 3.288
6 17% Lebanese + 83% Sindhi 3.4994
7 16.7% Jordanians + 83.3% Sindhi 3.5238
8 16.7% Jordanians + 83.3% Punjabi Arain 3.5608
9 15.8% Samaritians + 84.2% Sindhi 3.6356
10 16.9% Ashkenazi + 83.1% Sindhi 3.7077

This actually fits reasonably well with my actual ancestry (75% Punjabi + 25% Egyptian).

Related Reading