Tag Archives: eurogenes

Genome in the Wild

I tested with 23andme in April 2010 and then upgraded to their version 3 chip with almost a million SNPs last Christmas.

Now I am releasing my personal genome in the public domain.

CC0
To the extent possible under law, Zack Ajmal has waived all copyright and related or neighboring rights to Zack Ajmal 23andme v3 Genome. This work is published from: United States.

You can download my genome data in zipped files:

Razib has a list of people who have made their 23andme genomes public.

When Blaine Bettinger released his genome into the public domain, he issued a challenge:

So, I’m challenging everyone who reads this to download my data and analyze it to find the most interesting or surprising results. For example, you could use my most recent 23andMe V3 data.

I’ve already done a fair amount of analysis myself, including the Promethease reports above (and see here), and a recent blog post about my vastly increased Type 2 Diabetes risk. However, perhaps there’s a recent but relatively study that applies, or perhaps there’s a story you can weave with a handful of SNPs. Or, even better, what can you tell me about my ancestry other than mtDNA and Y-DNA haplogroups? Don’t worry about the strength of the study, reproducibility, etc. – I’m aware of the uncertainties associated with this type of research, and my goal here is to make people aware of possibilities.

Please post your findings in the comments below, and in two weeks I’ll pick the most surprising or interesting findings and make them the focus of a new blog post.

Can you surprise me with my own genome?

I have done a fair amount of analysis on my genome. For example, here’s my Promethease report. My ID is DOD128 in Dodecad, PKEG1 in Eurogenes and HRP0001 in Harappa.

My challenge for you would be to find interesting information about my chromosome 9 which is 93% homozygous.

If you analyze my genome, it would be great if you could let me know about what you found as I am always hungry for more information.

Related Reading

Eurogenes

Davidski of Eurogenes is also a genome blogger. In his admixture analysis for West, South and Central Asians, I am PKEG1 and my results are as follows:

European 4%
Siberian 1%
Caucasus 32%
Sub-Saharan African 4%
Middle Eastern 9%
East Asian 1%
South Asian 50%

Here’s a chart showing some of the reference samples and Eurogenes participants closest to me. As initially sorted, the list goes from most similar to me to least similar from top to bottom.

You can sort the bar chart by the different ancestral components by clicking on the legend on the right.

As you can see, Pathans and Punjabi Jatts are most similar to me in their admixture results.

Eurogenes also did a supervised admixture analysis by choosing 11 reference populations as the ancestral populations. Here are my results:

Pathan + Sindhi 86.39%
Middle Eastern (Jordanian + Palestinian) 10.78%
Sub-Saharan African (Mandenka + Yoruba) 2.82%
Anatolian + Caucasus (Armenian + Georgian) 0.00%
North Slavic (Polish + Belorussian) 0.00%
Western/Southern European (French) 0.00%
Balochi + Brahui + Makrani 0.00%
Burusho 0.00%
North Kannadi + Sakilli + Selected Gujarati 0.00%
East Asian (Han Chinese) 0.00%
Koryak + Nganassan + Yakut 0.00%

From these results, it doesn’t look like there is any Turkic, Turkish or Balkan ancestry in my past. I was also surprised at the really high Pathan + Sindhi percentage and the lack of so many of the others.

Related Reading